The Steps to Writing a Eulogy

By: Tom Gallagher
Wednesday, September 28, 2016

Writing a eulogy may seem like a very difficult task that you need to do. It is likely that you have so many different attributes and stories you want to talk about and you feel like you can’t possibly sum a life up into three to four minutes that you have to talk. With the three sections of the eulogy being broken down and explained to you, it may help to alleviate the overwhelming feeling of saying everything you want to.

 

A eulogy is a true and real reflection of the life that the deceased lived and the person they were. Speak from the heart and tell personal stories of the genuine times you shared with your loved one. This is the only authentic way to construct a heartfelt speech that the family and friends listening will truly take away from this day and remember for a lifetime.

 

These three steps will help you as you write a eulogy for a loved one:

 

  • Intro: Introduce who you are and the relationship you shared with the deceased. You can talk about the very first time you met them and list off some of the reasons they are very special and what makes them unique without going into any detail just yet. This will give you a structure to follow and help you choose the stories you will tell as they all come together and connect flowingly.

 

  • Body: The body of the eulogy is focused on the main points you made about what this person means to you. This is your time to tell the family and friends exactly why that is and how those attributes developed for you. The body generally is compiled of three different stories to share. These stories can be about anything that has meaning to you and really gives the audience a true reflection. Don’t hold back on the stories you tell! It may be a personal story that no one has heard before. These types of stories invite the audience into the relationship you shared with the deceased and open people’s eyes to how they were around other people as well. Also, adding a sense of humor to your speech is never right or wrong. Sometimes we feel uncomfortable or guilty for adding humor into a eulogy because it is indeed a sad place to be in, although, this tends to bring a smile to the face of the bereaved and add a tone of joy to this event of mourning.

 

  • Conclusion: In your conclusion of your speech you are giving your last words and wrapping the eulogy up. Deliver the main message you spoke of from the very beginning, whether you were focussing on the kindness of the person or how hard working they were, let the audience know the impact this person had on your life and how much you love and will miss them.

 

Eulogies indeed are a very personal part of your heart that you are sharing with the family and friends gathered t say their last goodbyes. You are opening up and delivering a message that is truly a gift and tribute to your loved one. If there are any song lyrics, poems, or prayers that really resonate with you and relate to the deceased, these are also relative to the person they were and keeps a memory alive. If you have any other questions or would like any further advice on eulogies, you can contact our professionals here at, Thomas Gallagher Funeral home.

 

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